First World War Biographies: E-M


Biographies of the servicemen named on the St Michael’s War Memorial for the First World War.

E F G H J K L M

E

Frederick (?Harold) Eames
5400 / 163107, Rifleman, 2/5th Battalion (London Rifle Brigade), London Regiment, later transferred to 774th Area Employment Company (attached Middlesex Regiment), Labour Corps
1889, Highgate – 30th October 1918, aged 30
Screen Wall 28.40968, Highgate Cemetery

He was the son of the general labourer Henry Eames (1862, Highgate) and his wife Emily Dickins (Lang Stokeley, Buckinghamshire), who had married in the Pancras district early in 1881.

In 1891 Frederick was living with his parents and four siblings at Mansfield Cottages, North Hill, Hornsey. In 1901 and 1911 Frederick was living at 26 Aveton Road, Finchley with his parents and siblings – the CWGC also records this address as his parents’ address at Frederick’s time of death. In 1911 Frederick was a general labourer in the building trade. His parents had had 10 children born alive by 1911, none of whom had died and all of whom were living with them in 1911.

Frederick married Elizabeth Louisa Seabrook in Islington on 28th May 1912. Their children were Frederick William (7th November 1912), Ellen Elizabeth (5th February 1914), Lilian Deborah (15th October 1915) and Henry (14th February 1918). He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though a W Eames does, possibly his younger brother Walter (1892, Highgate). He enlisted on 18th October 1916, giving his height as 5 foot 6, his address as 5 Blundell Street, Caledonian Road and his trade as labourer.

Frederick and Elizabeth’s last daughter Annie Elizabeth Eames (11th July 1918) was baptised at St Michael’s on 2nd September 1918, with her parents’ address given as 8 Chapel Yard and her father’s profession as “soldier”. However, she is not mentioned in his service record, meaning she may have died soon afterwards or that this was a different Frederick Eames.

Frederick was admitted to hospital with pneumonia on 1st October 1918, complaining of having been at home ill for four days and died at 11 am on 3rd October. His RIP appeared in the October 1918 parish magazine. His widow remarried to Ernest Arthur J Tilley (1892, Hendon) in Islington district in mid 1920 and was recorded by the CWGC as living at 5 Blundell Street, Islington. Ernest had served in the West Yorkshire Regiment, the Labour Corps and the Royal Army Medical Corps, enlisting on 14th March 1916 and being discharged due to sickness on 9th July 1919.
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William Thomas Ellner
6596 or 6595, Private,
3rd Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
1886, St Pancras – 24th May 1915, killed in action, Western Front, aged 29
Panels 6 and 8, Menin Gate, Ypres

He was the son of Thomas Ross Ellner (1857, Ramsgate, Kent – a railway foreman in 1911) and Sarah Ann Frewin (1857, Crowmarsh, Berkshire), who had married in the St Pancras district in 1877. [No William Thomas of correct age with these parents in 1891 census – red herring?]

Thomas Ross Ellner’s death on 8th January 1928 was recorded in the February 1928 parish magazine, giving condolences to his widow and stating he had been an invalid for some years and “a keen supporter of St Michael’s, though bad health had for some time made it impossible for him to attend its services.”

He appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, along with a Henry and a Herbert Ellner. He was living in Kentish Town when he enlisted in St Pancras district. His parents were living at 54 Kentish Town Road at the time of his death. In late 1909 he married Mary Esther Blanks in the St Pancras district. His widow remarried in mid 1917 in the St Pancras district, to Henry Knopp – the CWGC records her address as 17 Allcroft Road, Kentish Town.
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George William Evans
9006, Private,
1st Battalion, South Wales Borderers
1887, St Pancras – 15th November 1914, killed in action, Western Front, aged 27
Panel 22, Menin Gate, Ypres

He was the son of the carman Alfred Evans (1857, Shelton, Bedfordshire or Slapton, Buckinghamshire) and Mary Ann Evans (1851, Norfolk). They may have come from a London Welsh family, judging by the unit to which George William was later posted. They moved from Brixton to St Pancras between 1878 and 1881, judging by their children’s birthplaces.

In 1891 George was living with his parents and three siblings at 7 Haverstock Place, St Pancras, one of two large households at that address. He was living with his parents and one brother at 100 Robert Street, St Pancras in 1901, with his father now a carman for a vinegar works. He enlisted in London and appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, along with a J Evans. His parents were living at 22 Wellington Street, Camden Town at the time of his death.
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F

Arthur Edwin Finn
66171, Driver,
Royal Horse Artillery, later D Battery, 3rd Brigade, Royal Field Artillery
1883, St Giles, London – 13th October 1918, Salonika, aged 35
Grave 323, Kirechkoi-Hortakoi Military Cemetery, Greece

He was the son of James Edward Finn (1855, Westminster) and Selina Newberry (1857, Limehouse), who had married in Poplar in 1877. Three of the eleven children born alive to them by 1911 had died. They moved from Poplar to St Pancras between 1881 and 1884, then to St Pancras between 1884 and 1886, judging by their children’s birthplaces.

In 1891 Arthur was living with his parents and four siblings at 103 Harrison Street, St Pancras, with his father working as a carpenter and cabinet maker. None of the family can yet be found in the 1901 census. In 1911 his parents and two of their sons were living at 27 Oval Road, St Pancras, with James now a carpenter for the Express Motor Cab Company, but Arthur was elsewhere and as yet cannot be found in the 1911 census.

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. He enlisted in West London, where he was then living, though the date of his enlistment is unknown. His RIP appeared in the December 1918 parish magazine. His parents were living at 83 James Street, Camden Town at the time of his death.
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Ronald Arthur Flawith
128739, Private, 102nd Training Reserve Battalion and 52nd (Graduate) Battalion Training Reserve, Middlesex Regiment, later 43222, Private, 13th Battalion, Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment)
1899, Somers Town – 12th October 1918, 1st Casualty Station, Western Front, of wounds received in action
IV. A. 8. , St Venant Communal Cemetery

Like Francis Pywell’s wife Ellen, Ronald was the son of Lumley Smith Flawith (1863, St Giles, Bloomsbury – 1948, St Pancras) and Emma Jane Lemmon (1862, St Pancras), who had married in the parish of St Saviour’s, Southwark in early 1883. They had had ten children born alive by 1911, of whom only one had died. His father had already been a glass stainer’s apprentice by the time of the 1881 census and worked as a glass cutter (1901 census) or a Fret Lead Glazier (1911 census).

In 1901 Ronald was living with his parents at 119 Bayham Street, as the youngest of their eight children. The eldest of the children was Thomas Flawith (1883, Pancras), then working as a dental salesman. In 1911 Ronald was still living with his parents and six siblings at 2 Bartholomew Villas, Kentish Town. He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. He enlisted on Whitehall on 29th June 1917 for the duration of the war, giving his residence as Kentish Town. He was posted to the Army Reserve the following day.

His army medical exam occurred when he was mobilised on 17th September 1917. He was 5 foot 1 inch, with a small scar on the right of his neck. He weighed 109 pounds and was working as a ‘Pianoforte Apprentice’. On 16th July 1918 he arrived in France and was posted to an Infantry Brigade Depot of the British Expeditionary Force, before being transferred into the West Riding Regiment four days later at a depot at Etaples.

The telegram informing the family of his death was sent to his father at 34 Clarence Road, Kentish Town but did not arrive. Ronald had given his mother as his next of kin, with her address as 8 Bartholomew Road, Kentish Town, the address also given for his parents and his war-widowed sister Ellen by the CWGC. His siblings Thomas, Philip, William, Albert, Ernest, Ellen and Adelaide were all also living at that address at the time of Ronald’s death, whilst his brother John Cooper Flawith had moved to 102 Kings Road, Kentish Town. A declaration to that effect was countersigned by Thomas Henry Kett, one of the assistant priests at St Michael’s, in 1919. His effects were sent to his mother – they were two identity discs, photographs, cards, a pipe, a purse, a letters case and two coins. She also received his medals.

Another of Ellen and Ronald’s siblings, John Cooper Flawith (1884, St Pancras – 1974, St Pancras) rose to corporal in the Middlesex Regiment during the war. He had married Marguerite Bessie Guillian in Leicester in mid 1913 and three of their children were baptised at St Michael’s – on 13th February 1916 Marguerite Ellen (born 22nd December 1915); on 2nd June 1918, Clara Emma; and on 5th June 1927 Lydia Ellen (born 4th May 1927). In 1916 John’s address was given as 34 Oulton Road, South Tottenham. In 1911, 1916 and 1927 John gave his occupation as postman (as he had been in 1911). In 1918 he gave his profession as ‘soldier’ and his address as 102 King’s Road. In 1927 he was living at 10 Una House, Prince of Wales Road.

No record can be found of Ronald’s elder brother Thomas serving in World War One. Thomas is later recorded as winning an essay prize in the March 1923 parish magazine and as secretary of the Debating Society in the October 1923 issue. By then he had been a server for over 20 years. He married Violet Victoria Sheppard at St Michael’s on 14 June 1924, before his job took him to Newcastle soon afterwards. He was a widower at the time of this marriage, aged 41 and was the Manager of a Dental Depot. Violet was aged 27, giving her address as 30 Thornhill Clearings, Barnsbury – she was the daughter of George Edmund Sheppard, railway clerk. The marriage was witnessed by Maud Adill Sylvia Sheppard and Albert Ernest Flawith.
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Arthur Fordham
1699 / 613615, Private,
E Company, 1/19th Battalion, London Regiment
August 1883, St Pancras – 9th October 1918, St Pancras district, of illness caused by war service
Special Memorial, Row 1, St Pancras Cemetery

Arthur was born in 1883 – he had one sister Alice (1888, St Pancras) and one brother George (early 1889, St Pancras). Their mother Mary Ann was using the name Mary Ann Sutton on her marriage to John Corbett in early 1894. If this was not her maiden name, she seems to have married Henry Sutton (1856, Topcroft, Norfolk) in 1878 in St Pancras district, using the surname Bucksby or Bucksey. In 1881 that Henry and Mary Ann were living at 15, Wellington Street, St Pancras with their children Alfred Henry (1878, St Pancras – working as a railway carter), Edward (1884, London, probably St Pancras – working as a bricklayer’s labourer) and Alice (1888, London, probably St Pancras). In 1881, Henry was working as a railway porter.

In the 1901 census John and Mary Ann Corbett are living at 19 Hawley Crescent. Possibly in error, Arthur and his two siblings are recorded under the surname Corbett rather than Fordham. Alice (by then working as a syphon filler at a mineral water works) and George (by then working as a railway engine stoker) were still living with John and Mary Ann Corbett in 1911, as was Arthur’s son Arthur (1904, St Pancras – possibly 1964, St Pancras). Another relation might have been the John Morley Fordham (1878, St Pancras), living with his parents Morley Fordham (1851, Cambridgeshire; working as a farrier) and Mary Fordham (1856, Lambeth) at 39 Bayham Place in 1881 and living with his wife Lucy Long (1877, St Pancras) and his four daughters at 19 Hawley Crescent in 1911 – they had married in the Pancras district in 1897. One of his daughters, Lucy (31st March 1913, Pancras), was christened at St Michael’s on 2nd June 1913, with her parents’ address and 23 Queen Street and her father’s occupation as ‘Syphon Maker’ – in the 1911 census he had been working as a ‘Mineral Water Foreman’, which seems a neat link with Alice’s 1901 profession. Another of his 6daughters, Doris Lucy, was baptised at St Michael’s on 18th June 1916, with her father now an ‘Engineer’s Mate’ and the family address as 13 James Street.

On 6th June 1901 Arthur had an illegitimate daughter, Jessie Sarah Allan (1901, St Pancras, registered in Marylebone with the surname Allan not Fordham) by an eighteen-year-old Scotswoman, also called Jessie Sarah Allan (1883, Cromarty, Scotland – 1908, St Pancras). Jessie senior was still living with her parents in Woodend, Madderty, Perthshire in 1891 and seems to have arrived in London between 1891 and 1901. Arthur married Jessie senior on 9th August 1902 in the St Pancras district and Jessie junior took his surname. They had three further children, Arthur (29 February 1904) and Louise or Lorrie (27 July 1905, St Pancras) and Florence or Florrie (5th December 1906, St Pancras). Arthur’s wife died in 1908 and in 1911 he was living at 19 Johnson Street, Somers Town with his three daughters but without his son, who was living with Arthur senior’s mother Mary Ann Corbett at 19 Hawley Crescent. Arthur senior was then working as a French polisher.

Two of his service records survive. These show he served in the 17th Middlesex Rifle Volunteer Corps and the 19th Battalion of the London Regiment sometime before 1913, leaving them on “Termination of Engagement”. He re-enlisted into the territorials on 23rd July 1913 aged 29 years and 11 months, giving his occupation as bricklayer – he also gave that as his occupation on demob. In 1913 he stated he was in the employ of H G Cleaves, Park Royal, Willesden and gave his address as 19 Hawley Crescent. He stated he had previously served in the 17th Middlesex Rifle Volunteer Corps and the 19th Bn of the London Regiment, leaving them on “Termination of Engagement”. He was 5 foot 3 inches tall (though later in the records this somehow rises to 5 foot 5 inches!), with hazel eyes and dark brown hair.

He was mobilised on 5th August 1914, the day after war was declared, still working as a bricklayer. On 10th November that year he was posted to a home service battalion, though on 2nd September he had signed a form at Hatfield agreeing to serve abroad – territorials were not obliged to do so until they had signed such a form. He sailed from Southampton to Le Havre on 9-10 March 1915 and served on the Western Front from then onwards. He appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving.

He was admitted to 6th London Field Ambulance from 10th to 11th May 1916 with constipation. In February 1917, at Ouderdune, he first reported having the symptoms of nephritis, a kidney condition. On 2nd March 1917 he was admitted to hospital with albuminuria, another kidney complaint. He was returned to England on 7th March 1917 and examined by a medical board on 8th May regarding both conditions. This found him to have slight hyputeoply of the heart, “heaving aortic 2nd, blood pressure 200, eyes pulsating vessels seen, Arteries somewhat tortuous”. It found that the nephritis had become chronic and was the “result of Active Service, Exposure and wet in trench life”. It also concluded it was “Permanent. Total incapacity for 6 months” and recommended hospital treatment. He was discharged on 29th May 1917 as “no longer fit physically for War Service”.

On 23rd May 1917 he was awarded a weekly pension of 27/6 for 26 weeks and on 2nd June that year he was sent a Silver War Badge. However, he died on 9th October the following year. His medals were sent to his mother Mary Ann Corbett in 1922 “to hold in trust for the late soldier’s son A Fordham (minor) until he attains an age to appreciate their value” – she was also guardian to all his children, who were now orphans. She was only sent the War and Victory medals initially, with the 1914-15 Star following in 1926.
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Frederick Charles L. Freail
2355 / 250623, Private,
3rd Battalion, London Regiment
1897, St Pancras district – 1918, died of wounds, Rochdale district, Lancashire, aged 23

In 1901 he was living with his parents William (born at sea in 1866, working as a Checker of Goods on the railways) and Annie (born 1875 at Orsett, Essex) and his younger sister Amy at 6 Rochester Place, St Pancras district. All four of them had moved to 226 Arlington Road by the time of the 1911 census, now with Frederick’s elder brother William (born 1896, Hockley, Essex) and his younger brother Ernest (born 1901, London). He enlisted on 3rd September 1914 and so appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving (as does a W Freail). He was discharged due to his wounds on 5th February 1918 and issued with a Silver War Badge three days later – the record for it records his age as 23, though other records show he was only 21. He died in July or August 1918 in the Rochdale district of Lancashire and his RIP appeared in the August 1918 parish magazine, implying it occurred in July.
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(Stanley?) Edward Freemantle
M/8879, Coding Allie / Writer 3rd Class, HMS Invincible, Royal Navy,
3rd September 1892, Camden Town – 31st May 1916, Battle of Jutland, on board HMS Invincible

No Edward Freemantle can be found in the CWGC records. He may be identifiable with Stanley Edward Freemantle, who was the son of Horace Freemantle (late 1855, Hackney) and Harriett Ann Hopper (1857 or 1860, St Pancras or Paddington). Horace was living with his mother (a governess), a brother and his maternal grandmother Louise Uperagt in a stationer’s shop on Stationers Shop, Clapton Road, Hackney.

Horace joined the Army Medical Corps on 28th March 1878. On 3rd April 1881 he was a hospital orderly with the Army Hospital Corps, serving at the Haslar Military Hospital in Alverstoke, Hampshire. He then bought his way out of the army on 2nd June that year after 3 years and six days’ service. He married Harriett in Islington district in 1883 and they were living at 12 Pratt Street with their three children in 1891, with Horace working as a travelling salesman in the cigar trade (1891) and later in the general tobacco trade (1901). The couple were still living there in 1901, with the addition of Stanley, and Harriett was living there with Stanley and his two sisters in 1911, though she gave her status as married not widow.

Stanley joined up on 18th September 1914, giving his occupation as a draughtsman, as he had in the 1911 census. He was a dark brown hair, grey eyes and fresh complexion and was 5 foot 8 inches. He appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. He was first posted to HMS Victory in Portsmouth, before transferring to the battlecruiser HMS Invincible on 7th August 1915.
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G

John Gibson

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though a G Gibson does. His RIP appears in the April 1918 parish magazine.
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Charles Daniel Grant
103, Corporal,
9th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
1891, St Pancras – 9th April 1917, killed in action, Western Front, aged 27
Grave F24, Ste Catherine British Cemetery, near Arras

He was the son of Lacey Andrew Grant (late 1861, St Pancras – 1929, St Pancras) and Louisa Gibbons (early 1864, St Pancras), who had married in 1881 in the St Pancras district. They had had six children born alive by 1911, of whom two had died. In 1901 he was living with his parents and four siblings at 7 Brantholme Place, St Pancras, with his father working as a general labourer.

In 1911 Charles and his younger brother Albert (1895, St Pancras) were living at 63 James Street, St Pancras with their parents – his father was now a labourer for St Pancras Borough Council. Charles was now working as a French polisher. He appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. Charles enlisted in London, whilst living in Camden Town, probably at his parents’ house. By the time of his death, his parents were at 51 James Street, Camden Town.
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Frank (William) Groves
124799, Gunner, D Battery, 76th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery,
1890, Camden Town – 23rd April 1917, killed in action, Western Front, aged 27
Grave VII. E. 8, La Chaudiere Military Cemetery, Vimy

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though a J Groves does. He seems to be identifiable with the Frank William Groves living at 25 Bidborough Street in 1911 in the household of his elder brother Frederick Percy Groves (1886, Camden Town; metal worker). He was then working as a silver mounter. In 1912 he married Daisy V Jackson in the Pancras district. Frank had moved to Haverstock Hill by the time he enlisted in St Pancras at an unknown date. The CWGC gave his next of kin as his widow, with her address as 19 Wendell Road, Shepherd’s Bush.
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Frederick William or William Frederick Gudgeon
R/30110, Rifleman, 1st Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps
1897, St Pancras – 16th February 1918, killed in action, Western Front
Grave IV.B.12, Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel-le-Grand

His name was registered at his birth as William Frederick Gudgeon, as also given in his entry on the medal cards index and his death registration – only his Soldiers died in the Great War database entry uses Frederick William. If this is the correct man, in 1901 he seems to have been living at 79 Bayham Street, St Pancras with three siblings and his parents William Thomas Gudgeon (1867, St Giles; bookbinder) and Emily Jane Howell (1873, Blackfriars, Surrey), who had married in the St Pancras district in 1892. His name is recorded there as William and in the 1911 census as William F.

In 1911 the family are at 58 Bayham Street, Camden Town, with the father now working as a stationer’s cutter at a printer’s. The couple had had nine children born alive, all of whom were living with them in 1911, including William Frederick. He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. William Frederick was living in Kentish Town when he enlisted in St Pancras. His RIP appeared in the March 1918 parish magazine, whilst another for a Charles Gudgeon appeared in December 1918.
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H

Horace Hall

He appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, along with a C Hall. His RIP appeared in the December 1918 parish magazine.
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(Ulysse) Albert Bert Hannard
L/16091, Private, 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment)
early 1896, St Pancras – 20th September 1914, died of wounds, Vailly, Western Front
La Ferte-sous-Jouarre Memorial

His parents were Ulysse Hannard (1871, France) and Kate Constance Koettlitz or Koettlitz-Batho (1873, Islington), who had married in 1896. Kate was the daughter of two Germans, James (1829) and Kate Thorode (1849 or 1852 – 1907, St Pancras) – James was working as a machine maker in the 1891 census and Kate junior was then living with her parents at 37 Euston Street, St Pancras. Ulysse cannot be found in the 1891 census and may have arrived in Britain between 1891 and 1896. They had had 7 children born alive by 1911, of whom only 1 had died.

His birth was registered as Ulysse Albert Hannard, though all other records show him going by the name Albert or Albert Bert. In 1901 he was living at 31 Euston Square, St Pancras, with his parents and three sisters – his father was working as a brass musical instrument maker. Albert was working as an ironmonger’s errand boy and living with his mother (now working in service on “General Housework”) and four siblings at 27 Oval Road, St Pancras at the time of the 1911 census. His mother’s marital status was initially written on the 1911 census as “separated”, but this was amended to “married”. His father cannot be found in the 1911 census – he was still a French subject in the 1901 census and may have either been visiting relations back in France or wanted to dodge registration.

He was living in Watford when he enlisted in Hounslow. In November 1914 the parish magazine carried an “RIP” for George Hannard. Albert appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, with an RIP by his name. He has an entry in the De Ruvigny’s Roll of Honour, which shows his father was living in Camden Town at the time of Albert’s death. Records suggest his father later died in Paris.
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Henry Robert Harley
S/21594, Rifleman, 8th (Service) Battalion, Rifle Brigade (The Prince Consort’s Own)
late 1882, St Martin in the Fields – 21st March 1918, killed in action, Western Front, aged 35
Panels 81 to 84, Pozieres Memorial

He was the son of the printer compositor James Harley (1845, Perth, Scotland) and his wife Barbara Henderson (1848, Galashiels, Selkirkshire, Scotland – 1920, Islington). They were living at 193 Pleasance Hardwell Close, Edinburgh in 1871 with three children and moved from there to St Martin’s in the Fields in London between 1873 and 1874. In 1881 they and their eight children (eldest born in 1866) were living at 23 St Martins Street, St Martin in the Fields, where they were still living in 1891. By 1891 they had twelve children, including Henry, who was already working as a stained glass artist.

In 1901 Henry’s parents and five of their other children were living at 8 Phoenix Street, St Giles. Henry’s elder brother James (1870, St Cuthbert’s, Midlothian, Scotland) was then also working as a stained glass artist. Henry was working as a stained glass artist in 1901 and living just down the road, at 12 Phoenix Street, St Giles, with his elder brother William (1866, Edinburgh), then an upholsterer, as he had been since at least 1881. Henry’s age is given in the 1901 census as 13, when it should be 18. In 1901 Henry and William are both still single.

Henry’s father died between 1901 and 1911 (a death registration in Paddington for September 1902 is possibly him, but gives age at death as 35, which is incorrect for him), since in 1911 Barbara is living as a widow at 21 Fourth Avenue, Queens Park, Paddington with her youngest son Louis (1891, St Martin in the Fields – working as a silversmith improver). The couple had had 10 children born alive before 1911, of whom 3 had died. They had been married 13 years prior to James’ death.

Henry married a woman called Ellen (1882, Clapham) between 1901 and 1911. They married in 1904 according to the 1911 census, which states they had been married seven years. The only marriage registration for that date is for a Henry Harley to an Ellen Goldsmith in Sheffield, which seems odd but cannot be ruled out. In 1911 he was living at 103 Arlington Road, Camden Town with his wife and their two sons William Harry (late 1906, St Pancras) and James Edward (early 1909, St Pancras) – they had also had one other child born alive who had died before 1911. In 1911 Henry was still working as a glass painter. He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. He enlisted in St Pancras whilst living in Camden Town. His widow is recorded as still living at 103 Arlington Road at the time of his death by the CWGC.
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Walter Harris
Y/1459 or Y/1457, Rifleman, 2nd Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps,
Unknown, St Pancras – 10th February 1915, killed in action, Western Front,
Grave II.G.1., Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos

A Samuel Walter Harris was baptised at St Michael’s on 11th April 1897, with his parents given as the labourer Albert Victor Harris and his wife Martha Key, living at 129 Bayham Street. However, when Albert recurs in the 1911 census all but one of their four children is listed as having died – the survivor is Albert John. The Walter Harris on the war memorial is therefore probably not Albert’s son.

Two possible relations, John and Nellie Harris of 43 Wellington Street, appear twice in the baptismal records of St Michael’s. Two of their daughters were baptised on 27th July 1914, with their father’s occupation given as window cleaner, with Victor Douglas following on 9th October 1916, with his father’s occupation now given as “Soldier”.

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though an E Harris does. He was living in Camden Town when he enlisted at St Paul’s Churchyard.
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William Harris

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though an E Harris does. He is recorded as RIP in the November 1916 parish magazine.
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Richard Joseph Hersant
3205 / 453109, Lance Corporal, 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria’s Rifles), London Regiment, later 11th (County of London) Battalion (Finsbury Rifles), London Regiment
mid 1891, Clapham – 19th April 1917, killed in action, Battle of Gaza
Grave XIV.F.4., Gaza War Cemetery

Stanley James Hersant
394047, Rifleman, 9th (County of London) Battalion (Queen Victoria’s Rifles), London Regiment
late 1898, St Pancras – 25th August 1918, killed in action, Western Front
Grave I.A.9., Bray Vale British Cemetery, Bray-sur-Somme

Richard and Stanley were brothers. Their parents were Frederick Orton Hersant (1860, St Pancras – 1921, Hampstead) and Lydia Cooper (1863, St Pancras – 1949, Islington). Like his father Thomas Hersant (1824, St Pancras), Frederick worked as a book binder (1891 and 1901 censuses) and was a sidesman at St Michael’s. Lydia was the daughter of James Cooper (1834, St Pancras) and Ellen (1834, St Pancras), who had married in the Pancras district in 1857 – James was a silversmith’s clerk and died between 1861 and 1871. In 1871 Lydia was living with her widowed mother, her younger brother Arthur J (1870, St Pancras) and two visitors at 173 Tottenham Court Road (also the family home in 1861). In 1881 she was a housemaid in a dentist’s household at 15 Endsleigh Gardens.

Frederick and Lydia registered their marriage in the St Pancras district in 1885 (though they do not appear in the marriage register for St Michael’s) and were living at 11 Abyssinia Road, Battersea in 1891, with their eldest son Arthur Frederick (1888, Clapham) and Lydia’s siblings Annie A Cooper (1860, St Pancras – working as a Telegraphist in 1901 and a Government Clerk in 1911) and Arthur J Cooper (now working as a jeweller’s assistant). In 1901 Richard and Stanley were living with their parents at 194 Great College Street, along with Arthur, Annie and a visitor called Annie M Parish (1865, Westminster – also working as a Government Clerk).

In the 1911 census the two brothers were still living with their parents, now at 24 Hamilton Street, Camden Town. Stanley was still at school, but Richard was working as an advertisements clerk for Sir George Newnes and Company (owners of the Strand Magazine of Sherlock Holmes fame, along with many other titles). Frederick was now a porter at a military hospital and Lydia gave her occupation as “Mission Woman – St Michael’s Church”, a role also attested to in the parish magazines. Two of the five children born alive to them before that date had died, possibly including Sydney Hersant (1893, Pancras – 1894, Pancras)

The only other person in the Hersant household in 1911 was Arthur Cooper, now working as a billiard maker. Arthur Frederick Hersant had married Edith Eleanor Williams (1890, Westminster) in Whitechapel late in 1910 and in 1911 was living with her at 13 Goldney Road, Paddington whilst working as a dining car steward for the Great Western Railway. In 1912 he joined the Amalgamated Society of Railway Servants trades union’s Paddington branch, now as a “Dining Car Conductor”. On 19th April 1914 their son Reginald Arthur was baptised at St Michael’s, with Arthur and Edith’s address given as 75 Ridge Street, Watford and Arthur’s profession as ‘Signalman’. Arthur survived the war (no record of his military service – if any – can be found) and died in 1963 in Watford district. The June 1913 parish magazine stated they were glad to have Mrs Hersant back in the congregation after an absence due to an operation.

Richard but not Stanley appears on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. Stanley and Richard both enlisted in London, with Richard giving his residence as Camden Town and Stanley as the St Pancras district. Richard was badly wounded on the Western Front, but recovered to be sent to serve in Palestine as part of the Egyptian Expeditionary Force. The July 1917 parish magazine reported that Richard had been posted as wounded and missing since the battle of Gaza, noting “It seems as if he had reached the Promised Land only to disappear again from sight.” Richard’s RIP appeared in the February 1918 parish magazine. The August 1918 parish magazine reported a Missal bound in blue calfskin and the parish’s first silver pyx for taking to the sick had been given in Richard’s memory – a private pyx had previously had to be borrowed for the purpose. The 1923 guide to the church from the parish magazine mentions an “exquisitely bound Missal, used at the early Masses on Sundays, which was given in memory of one who fell in the Great War” – this may be the blue-bound one in memory of Richard.

Stanley was posted missing for a long time before his death was confirmed. The parish magazine of December 1918 carried his RIP and noted he had been “in our choir for some years, and also acted as Server. He was (like his [elder] brother, to whom he was devoted) always regular in his attendance at church, and at Holy Communion; and both boys were a treasure to their Parents at home. Now they have gone together to another home, and their photographs are placed side by side near the Calvary in Church.” He had also been a Sunday School teacher and a member of the committee of the parish’s Free-Will Offering Fund. The December 1919 parish magazine reported that Stanley’s parents had given a new chasuble to the parish in his memory.

The March 1920 issue stated the boys’ mother was “recovering her strength” and that the writer hoped “that the rest which she is now having away from London will set her up completely, and that she will be able to resume her work [as Mission Woman] in about a month’s time.” In May 1920 their father was reported as one of the two men carrying the pictures for the outdoor stations of the cross. The February 1921 magazine reported that Mrs Hersant had recently been ill and Mr Hersant was in Charing Cross Hospital – the April magazine that year reported that Frederick had died. His widow lived on until 17th August 1949 and an obituary by Fr Osborn appeared in the October 1949 parish magazine, mentioning that they were “both the same age”, that during her final illness she had been in the Highgate Hospital at the same time as he was in the nearby Royal Northern Hospital and that he had been able to send her a message. It added that she had been “Faithful to the end to St Michael’s Church and St Michael’s people” and despite her bereavements had continued with “her duties with unflinching regularity” and that “Latterly, when her sight and hearing began to fail, some of her friends took it in turns to go in every day and do all they could to help, which cheered her up greatly, and most of all she valued the gift of her Communion which the Vicar brought her every week.”
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Albert Hovell
5399, Sergeant, 64th Brigade, Machine Gun Corps (Infantry),
Unknown – 26th September 1916
Pier and Face 5C and 12C, Thiepval Memorial
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Frederick John Howes
38993, Gunner, Royal Horse Artillery and A Battery, 85th Brigade, Royal Field Artillery
1886, St Pancras – 20th July 1916, killed in action, Western Front
Pier and Face 1A and 8A, Thiepval Memorial

He was the son of Frederick Howes (1858, Marylebone) and Anne or Annie Maria Lane (1860, Marylebone – 1910, St Pancras), who had married in Marylebone district in 1885. In 1891 he was living with them as their only child at 82 Great Titchfield Street in Marylebone – his father was working as a blind maker. The family cannot yet be found in the 1901 census.

In late 1910 Frederick John married Elizabeth Shine in the St Pancras district and in 1911 he was living with her, their 5-month-old son Frederick John (1911, St Pancras) and his father at 11 Cobourg Street, Euston Square, St Pancras. Both he and his father were now working as Spring Roller Blind Makers. He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. Frederick enlisted in St Pancras. His daughter Catharine was baptised at St Michael’s on 12th February 1917, with her parents’ address given as 219 Arlington Road.
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William Henry Hurlock
613497, Private, 1/19th (County of London) Battalion (St Pancras), London Regiment
1893, St Pancras – 15th July 1917, killed in action, Western Front
Grave III.D.1, Reninghelst New Military Cemetery, Belgium

He was the son of Albert William Hurlock (1854, St Pancras) and Frances Sarah Soane (1853, Pimlico or St George’s Hanover Square), who had married in 1882 in the St Pancras district. In 1901 he was living with them and two elder siblings at 10 Charrington Street, St Pancras. In 1911 he was living with his mother and his elder brother Frederick John (1885, St Pancras) at 36 Queen Street NW, St Pancras and working as a vanguard for a wines and spirits company.

By 1911 his mother’s marital status was unknown, though two of the five children born to her alive by 1911 had died by 1911. He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. William enlisted in Camden Town, at which time his residence was recorded as Bayham Street, NW.
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J

Fred (Frederick Oswald) James, MM (Military Medal)
P/4108, Rifle Brigade, later TR/13/37993, 112th Training Reserve Battalion, Rifle Brigade, later R/34250, Rifleman, 12th (Service) Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps
1897, Delabole, Camelford district, Cornwall – 2 April 1918, killed in action, Western Front, aged 22
Panels 61 to 64, Pozieres Memorial

Fred was born in Cornwall to the railway porter Frederick James (1867, Gloucestershire) and his wife Eliza (1861, Delabole, Cornwall-1927, Pancras district) – when they married is unclear, but it may have been in Northleach, Gloucestershire in 1888. In 1901 Fred was living at 45 Twyford Street, Islington with his parents and a boarder. His mother re-married in the Pancras district in mid 1908 to John Hallaway (1863, St Pancras-1943, Hendon), a warehouseman in the wine trade (1901 census) or wine merchant’s porter (1911 census).

In 1871 John Hallaway had been living with his parents and two siblings at 4 Pleasant Pass, St Pancras – his mother Eliza (1837, Finchley) was a laundress and his father Henry (1832, Finchley) a cab driver. He married in the Pancras district in 1888 to his first wife Emily Aistrop or Sparks (1867, 1869 or 1872, Holborn – 1905, St Pancras). In 1901 John and Emily were living at 3 Bayham Street with their three children Emily Hallaway (1891, St Pancras), George William Hallaway (1893, St Pancras) and Albert Edward Hallaway (1898, St Pancras).

Fred was a confirmation candidate at St Michael’s in 1910 aged 13, giving his address as 90 Bayham Street, where he also appears in the 1911 census with his mother, step-father and all three step-siblings. Emily was now working as a kitchen maid and William as a butcher’s assistant but Fred (with his name given as ‘A Fred James’) and Albert were both still at school. They were occupying four rooms. Emily seems to have married the carman Henry Cannell (1890, Marylebone) of 2 Seaford Street, Regent Square late in 1913 in the Pancras district. Henry survived the war and they had a child, Henry A Cannell (1920, Pancras).

The ‘Soldiers Died in the Great War’ database states Fred enlisted in the St Pancras district and that at that time he was living in Camden Town. This means he may have begun his army service in 16th (Service) Battalion (St Pancras) of the Rifle Brigade, formed in the Borough of St Pancras on 2nd April 1915 by the Parliamentary Recruiting Committee – this would certainly fit with his absence from the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. Each infantry battalion consisted of about 1007 men, divided into four front-line companies and one or more headquarters or depot companies which stayed in the UK to train, administer and recruit for the battalion. The depot companies of 16th Battalion were converted into 17th (Reserve) Battalion of the same regiment in October 1915, which was then converted into 112th Training Reserve Battalion of 26th Reserve Brigade at Wimbledon on 1st September 1916. Since 112th Training Reserve Battalion is recorded as Fred’s second unit, it seems likely he initially joined one of its precursors.

He was killed in the latter stages of the German Spring Offensive of 1918. His battalion suffered so heavily that eighteen days after his death it was pulled out of the line to receive new drafts of men, only returning to action at the Battle of the Selle that October. His mother and step-father’s address was recorded as still being 90 Bayham Street by the Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

Fred’s step-brother Albert also enlisted in the St Pancras district and died of wounds on 6th November 1918, just five days before the Armistice, whilst serving as a private with 6th Battalion, Northamptonshire Regiment – he was buried at VIII.A.22 in Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension, 10 kilometres west of Le Cateau. Earlier in 1918 he had married Ivy Lydia Leonard (1899, Pancras), the daughter of a gullyman for the borough council – the CWGC records her address as 17 Pratt Street, her parental home in the 1911 census. She had been living there with her five siblings and her parents George William Leonard (1864, Bermondsey) and Martha Alice Moore (1860, Bermondsey). George and Martha had married in St Saviour’s Southwark district early in 1884 and judging by their children’s birthplaces had moved from Walworth to Camden between 1887 and 1893. Fred’s other step-brother George Hallaway served with 22nd (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment (Queen’s) or the Royal Field Artillery and survived the war.
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(Alfred) Reginald Jennings
18926, Sergeant, 1/5th Battalion, Prince Albert’s (Somerset Light Infantry), later Flight Cadet, 23rd Training Squadron, Royal Air Force
1897, Shepherd’s Bush – 8th October 1918, Egypt, aged 21
Grave B.90, Alexandria (Hadra) War Memorial Cemetery

He was the son of the house painter Walter Alfred Jennings (1871, Clerkenwell) and Ada Emma Tygat (late 1874, Camden Town), who had married in the St Pancras district in 1896. They initially lived in Marylebone, moving to Shepherd’s Bush between 1897 and 1898. Apart from possible interludes at Hammersmith between 1900 and 1902 (their 1901 address is 5 Redmore Road, Hammersmith) and Chiswick between 1905 and 1906, they remained in Shepherd’s Bush until some time between 1906 and 1908, when they moved to Camden Town.

In 1901 Reginald’s parents were living in Hammersmith with three of their children but without Reginald, who cannot yet be found in that census. In 1911 Reginald was living with his parents and ten siblings at 2 Priory Place, Camden Town. None of the 11 children born alive to the couple had died by 1911.

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. Reginald was living in Kentish Town when he enlisted in London. He won the Military Medal and bar. Only his mother Ada was alive at the time of his death, with her address at that time being 36 Carlton Road, Kentish Town. His RIP appeared in the parish magazine in November 1918.
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Harry Johnson

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving.
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John Jones

K

Alfred John Kalthoeber
G/17256 / 27499, Private, Middlesex Regiment, later Acting Corporal or Corporal, 12th Battalion, Suffolk Regiment
1889, St Pancras district – 15th September 1916, Western Front, killed in action, aged 27
Grave I. H. 50, Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe

He was the son of Alfred Henry or Harry Kalthoeber (1856, Marylebone) and Charlotte Sophie Burns (1857, St Pancras), who had married at All Saints’, Camden Town on 11th November 1888. Their address at that time was 5 University Street. She was the daughter of John Burns, a coach sawyer. Alfred Henry was already a carver and gilder, the same profession as his father William Napoleon Kalthoeber (30th December 1816, Westminster – 1896, St Pancras; baptised at All Souls, Marylebone) – this is also Alfred Henry’s profession in the 1891, 1901 and 1911 censuses. The Kalthoebers may have been descended from a family of German bookbinders who immigrated to England late in the 18th century and originally settled on Duchy Lane, just off the Strand.

Alfred John was their only child (or the only child born alive to them, in the phraseology of the 1911 census). In 1891 he was living with his parents at 57 Warren Street – his mother was working as an upholstress. In 1901 all three of them were at 82 Hampstead Road (one of four households at that address), with a 45-year old lodger, Robert Woolls, a carpet planner.

In 1911, Alfred John and his parents were at 65 Stanhope Street, St Pancras, with his mother now working as a needlewoman. He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. Alfred John enlisted in London. His parents were living at 24 Hawley Crescent, Kentish Town at the time of his death.
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John Lee

M

Alfred Mark Manley
19774, Private, 8th Battalion, Bedfordshire Regiment
1887, St Pancras or Hampstead – 15th October 1916, killed in action, Western Front
Pier and Face 2C, Thiepval Memorial

He was the son of Alfred Manley (1864, St Pancras or Hampstead) and Rose Honor Hall (1867, Hampstead), who had married in early 1886 in Hampstead district. His birthplace is given in the 1891 and 1901 censuses as Hampstead but the 1911 census as St Pancras – either Hampstead is an error or his birth happened in one place but was registered in another. In 1891 he was living with his parents at 19 Gardnor Road, Hampstead (one of two households living there). Also with them were his two younger siblings Frank (1888, Kensal Green or Hampstead) and Maggie or Margaret Rose (1890, Hendon or Hampstead). His father’s profession was then given as ‘Surveyor and Clerk’.

In 1901 he was living at 54, Archer Street, St Pancras with his married father (then working as a clerk) and three siblings, Frank, Maggie and Elsie Honor (1892, Holloway or Highgate). In 1911 he was at 216 Clarence Buildings, Clarence Road, Kentish Town – his father was now a widower and working as a house decorator, whilst Alfred Mark was a porter for a furniture dealer and Elsie as an assistant in a fancy bead shop.

Alfred does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though an F Manley does, probably Alfred’s younger brother Frank. Frank had been baptised at St Michael’s aged 28 on 21st May 1916, with his address given as 60 Victoria Road, probably in readiness for his marriage to Pearl Eva May Pragnell at St Michael’s on 22nd May 1916, with her address given as 137 Camden Street and her father as the farmer William Pragnell. In the marriage register, Frank is given as a ‘Fitter’ and his father as a ‘Decorator’. Frank and Pearl’s daughter Margaret Gladys was baptised at St Michael’s on 27th May 1917, with Frank’s occupation given as aerial mechanic and his address as 133 Osmaston Road, Derby – the writer in the register almost confused the two brothers on this occasion, since Frank was a correction of Alfred. Alfred was living in Kentish Town (probably in his father’s house) when he enlisted in the St Pancras district.
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(Charles) William Mansbridge
147111, Gunner, 124th Heavy Battery Royal Garrison Artillery, later 572137, Gunner, 102nd Labour Company, Labour Corps
1895, St Pancras – 8th November 1918, aged 23
Service Plot 5 (Joint Grave), St Pancras Cemetery

He was the son of Charles William Mansbridge (30th November 1870 or 1874, St Giles’s) and Ellen Mills (1874, St Pancras), who had married on 12th March 1895. Charles senior’s parents were called John and Sarah. Charles senior and Ellen had had 8 children born alive by 1911, of which three had died. In 1901 Charles junior was living with them at 49, Compton Street, St Pancras, with his younger brother John Alfred (1898, St Pancras) and his younger sister Ellen (1900, St Pancras). Charles senior was working as a coal carman. His parents were living at 47 James Street, Camden Town at the time of his death.

By 1911 Charles junior, John Alfred, Ellen and their parents were all living at 33 Johnson Street, St Pancras, along with the further children George Mansbridge (27th September 1905, St Pancras) and the 7-month-old Flossie Eadie or Florence Edith (21st August 1910, St Pancras). Charles senior was still a coal porter but was out of work and Charles junior was now working as an “O S Seaman”.

Charles senior enlisted at the headquarters of A Company of 3/19th Battalion London Regiment on Camden High Street on 25th April 1915 – he was 5 foot 7 inches (though he had shrunk an inch by discharge!). On enlistment, he only gave George and Florence as his children – possibly Charles junior was no longer a dependent on his father. He was absent without leave eight times in 1915. He was hospitalised with influenza from 1 January to 4 February 1916. On 15th January he was transferred to 1/19th Battalion, London Regiment, then on 1st February to 106 Guard Battalion. During February and March 1916 he was stationed at Beckenham and went AWOL three times as well as breaking away from his escort and escaping when he was being taken back under guard. In March 1916 he was transferred to 32nd Battalion. He then went AWOL from North Weald and Frinton on Sea three times over the rest of 1916 and once more on 11th February 1917. On 9th February 1917 he was also sentenced for “Allowing himself to become in a verminous condition” and on 11th April that year for being late on parade. On 8th August 1917 he was posted to 16th Battalion, Royal Defence Corps.

Charles senior ended the war serving in C Protection Company, Royal Defence Corps, which had been formed in 1917 from men too old to serve abroad and instead employed on guard duties at strategic points and POW camps. He was discharged at Cliffe-at-Hoo, Kent on 6th May 1918 on account of his age, having served entirely in the UK and with his address as 47 James Street, Camden Town. His discharge papers stated he had a tattoo of an anchor on his left forearm and was slight with brown eyes and a dark complexion. He was also issued with a greatcoat on demob, transferred to the W(T) Class Army Reserve and ordered to report to Mr Humphreys, Office Controller of Coal Mines, Holborn Viaduct. Charles junior does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving, though a J Mansbridge does. Charles junior’s younger brother John Alfred married Annie Victoria Adcock in St Pancras district in 1921. Their son John Alfred Mansbridge was baptised at St Michael’s on 3rd August 1925, with his father working as a bricklayer and his parents living at 25 Leybourne Road, but he lived less than a year.
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John Masters

The parish magazine’s list of those serving suggests he died before March 1915.
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Alfred Felton Mathews
2657, Rifleman, 1st /12th Battalion (The Rangers), London Regiment
late 1894, Kentish Town – 5th May 1915, killed in action, Western Front
Panel 54, Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres

He was the son of William Felton Mathews (1865, Highworth, Wiltshire). William was living in his birthplace in 1871 with his widowed mother, a beer retailer. He was working as an apprentice carpenter and living with his master at Shrivenham, Berkshire in 1881. He moved to the St Pancras district between then and the 1891 census, when he is lodging with the Childs family at 5 Pleasant Passage and working as a wheelwright.

Early in 1892, in the St Pancras district, William married Emily Shewry or Shurey (1871, Southampton, Hampshire). William might have met her through her father, who was also a carpenter. Emily’s father had been born on Jersey in the Channel Islands and had moved his wife and family from Southampton to Lambeth by 1873. In 1881 Emily was living with her parents at family at 7 Berkley Street, Lambeth and in 1891 she was living and working as a housemaid for a retired maths teacher and his family at 2 Bartholomew Road, Islington.

The couple had six children, all in Kentish Town – William Lovegrove (1893, Kentish Town), Alfred, Dorothy Evelyn Mary (late 1898, Kentish Town), Cecil Charles (mid 1902, Kentish Town), Winifred Frances (early 1906) and another child who had died before 1911, possibly Rosa Emily (mid 1896, St Pancras – mid 1897, St Pancras).

In 1901 William and Emily were living with Alfred and his two siblings at 31 Weedington Road, Kentish Town – William was now working as a house carpenter. In 1911 they had moved to 12 Drury Road, Harrow on the Hill (also given as their address at the time of his death by the CWGC), with Alfred and his four surviving siblings (one other child born alive to them before 1911 had died before 1911). Alfred was now an apprentice furrier and William was still a house carpenter (more specifically, at a clothier’s).

According to the July 1915 parish magazine, Alfred went without his summer holiday in 1914 “to save money for being trained” as a missionary. Alfred was in the forces by March 1915, when he appears on a list in the parish magazine of parishioners already serving. The Soldiers Died in the Great War database states his place of enlistment as London and his residence at enlistment as Harrow (probably at his parents’ house).

The June 1915 parish magazine carried an RIP notice for him and has a notice of his death, stating the news had been received “last week” and calling him “the first of our old Choir Boys to lay down his life for his King and country”. It continues “He had been on Hill 60 for some time, and in the trenches for three weeks without being relieved. Our hearts will go out in deepest sympathy for his Father (who is still in our Choir) and his Mother”. The July 1915 issue added that “he was acting as stretcher-bearer and was helping to carry in a wounded comrade at the time when he met his death.” and referring to his intention to become a missionary “God willed it otherwise, but it shows how his mind was set on giving his life for others, and adds to the honour in which his name will be held by his many friends.”

Samuel Alfred Mathews, 47, widower, engineer, 56 Delaney Street, son of Samuel Mathews, deceased, married ?Gwen Loniss Jenkins, 44, spinster of same address, William Jenkins’ daughter, deceased, on 25th February 1920 at St Michael’s.
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Gerard Matthew

(William) Henry Mayer, Maior or Maier
G/5895, Private, 6th Battalion, Buffs (East Kent Regiment)
1887, Homerton – 17th April 1916, killed in action
Panel 15 to 19, Loos Memorial

In 1891 he was living on Hockley Street, Hackney with his parents Andrew Mayer (1851, Hackney) and Elizabeth (1852, Bethnal Green) and two brothers. Andrew was a timber dealer. He married Margaret Willson Walker in Southwark district late in 1904. They had at least two children, George Edward (5th December 1910, St Pancras) and Eileen (23rd October 1913).

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. He was living in Camden Town when he enlisted in Marylebone. His children George and Eileen were both baptised at St Michael’s on 22nd November 1916, with their parents’ address at the time given as 26 Hawley Crescent and their father’s occupation as “Private East Kent Regiment”.
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Albert Munroe or Munro
2337, Private, 19th (County of London) Battalion (St Pancras), London Regiment
probably 1895, St Pancras or Westminster – 17th May 1915, killed in action, Western Front, on the third day of the Battle of Festubert
Grave I.H.23, Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy

He does not appear on the parish magazine’s March 1915 list of those already serving. He was living in the Regent Park area when he enlisted in Camden Town. This probably links him to the Albert Munro (1895, St Pancras) who appears at 7 Laxton Place (by the south-east corner of Regent’s Park) in the 1911 census.

If he is the figure in the 1911 census, he was the son of the boot closer David Thomas Munro (early 1867, Windsor, Berkshire), himself the son of a boot closer, Henry Munro (1838, London). In 1881 David was living with his parents and siblings at 40 Broad Street, St James’s, Westminster. In late 1888 he married Albert’s mother Annie Louisa Sadler (1868, Clapham) in Wandsworth district. She was the daughter of a gardener in domestic service from Leytonstone and had been living with her parents at 24 Victoria Road, Clapham in 1871 and at 9 Lime Cottages, Battersea Rise in 1881.

David and Annie had their earliest surviving child in Pimlico – Irene Louisa (early 1890, Pimlico; birth registered at St George’s Hanover Square). They are living at 239 Arlington Road, St Pancras in 1891, with only Irene and with Annie working as a machinist. They had two more children in the St Pancras district – May H (1893, St Pancras) and Albert. They had moved to Wandsworth district by the birth of Mabel M (late 1898, Wandsworth or Battersea) and were still there in the 1901 census, living at 23 Thorndean Street with Irene, May, Albert (giving his birthplace as Westminster) and Mabel. They were still in Wandsworth for the birth of Donald (1903, Wandsworth), but may have briefly moved to Hampshire around the time of the birth of Violet Matilda (late 1906, Gosport, Hampshire).

In 1911 David and Annie are living at 7 Laxton Place with Albert, May, Mabel, Donald and Violet (four of the ten children born alive to them between then and 1911 had died by 1911). May and Albert are now both working, he as a boot closer like their father and she as a tailoress at a tanning factory.
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